BlogFailure to Build a High-Quality Child Care System is a Major Misstep in the Mayor’s Budget

June 2, 2021

Failure to Build a High-Quality Child Care System is a Major Misstep in the Mayor’s Budget

By Danielle Hamer of DC Fiscal Policy Institute and Jarred Bowman of DC Action, both organizations are members of Under 3 DC (en Espanol debajo)

Mayor Bowser missed an unprecedented opportunity to combine federal and local funding to make bold, transformative investments that would strengthen the District’s early childhood system and ensure a just recovery for all children, families, and early learning programs. Her fiscal year (FY) 2022-2025 budget for early education fails to take transformative steps toward a high-quality, equitable, and sustainable early education systemas envisioned in the Birth to Three for all DC Law, which remains largely unfunded since its passage in 2018. The Mayor’s proposal uses nearly $147 million in American Rescue Plan (ARP) and other federal funding through FY 2025 to make short-term investments sprinkled across a range of programs (Table 1).

The DC Council must deliver on its promise to ensure equity begins at birth by making a local, long-term investment in child care and the Birth-to-Three law to support children, early educators, and the DC economy.

Proposed Budget Stabilizes Child Care Programs but Lacks Strategic Vision

The Mayor’s proposed budget allocates federal dollars to stabilize the child care sector, which has been hard hit by the pandemic. The stabilization grants would cover operating and health-related costs from the pandemic for 425 child care programs, totaling $16 million in the proposed revised FY 2021 budget and $40 million in FY 2022, with no funding thereafter. Early learning programs have faced deep financial hardship throughout the pandemic, as the health crisis increased business costs and sank revenues. Quickly administered stabilization grants will be critical to getting these small businesses back on their feet.

While the Mayor’s proposal allocates $10 million of ARP funding in FYs 2022 and 2023 to support higher subsidy reimbursement rates for child care providers, the investments are non-recurring and do not fully meet the Under 3 DC coalition’s $60 million recurring ask to pay providers and teachers more fairly. Federal funds can provide much-needed short-term relief, but will not ensure fair, livable wages for the many early educatorsprimarily Black and brown womenearning lower incomes than their peers in public education. Early educators are paid 67 cents for every dollar public school educators earn.

Rather than making long-term, local investments in equal and fair compensation, the Mayor allocates $18.5 million across FY 2023 and 2024 to pilot and examine the effects of bonuses for programs that pay infant-toddler educators’ wages commensurate with education credentials. Retention isn’t something that the city needs to test: higher pay attracts a more skilled workforce, reduces turnover, and connects to better child outcomes, research shows. Educators cannot wait another year for fair pay.

Proposed Budget Spreads ARP Dollars Thin, Limiting their Impact

The Mayor’s budget sprinkles federal funding across several other short-term investments, including:

  • $6 million across FYs 2022 and 2023 to pilot a program that would incentivize child care educators with bonuses of up to $1,500 if they stay in their profession for 12 months or complete an education credential.
  • $4.4 million across FYs 2022 and 2023 to provide additional college scholarship funding for 2,000 early childhood educators seeking a CDA, Associates’s Degree, or Bachelors degree.
  • $32 million for Back2Work Childcare grants for 90 child care programs that closed during the pandemic to pre-emptively open more slots so that providers are better prepared to meet demand when people return to work.
  • $10 million in an additional round of Access to Quality (A2Q) grants focused on increasing quality and high-quality child care supply in shortage areas.

The District was short on its supply of early education slots before the pandemic, and while these funds are critical for recovery, they are non-recurring investments and, without local, permanent investment, will not ensure sustainable child care expansion and support.

Proposed Budget Falls Short of Advocates’ Requests for Health Programs

The proposed budget falls short of the Under 3 DC Coalition’s ask for $675,000 in recurring funding to expand Healthy Futures, a mental health consultation program that builds the capacity of child care staff and families to respond to challenging behaviors and mental health needs in children ages 0-3. The budget adds just $480,000 for this needed investment. Enhancements to Healthy Futures would ensure that more child development programs participating in the District’s child care subsidy program were ready to provide much-needed mental and behavioral health support to their communities once they return to in-person care.

One Birth-to-Three enhancement completely missing from the Mayor’s budget is funding for Healthy Steps. The program integrates a licensed child development health professional in pediatric primary care settings to help parents adapt to life with a new baby and get connected to infant-toddler resources that help families thrive. The Birth-to-Three for All DC law calls for $300,000 in additional recurring local investments in Healthy Steps to expand to one additional pediatric primary care site in Wards 5, 7, or 8 each year. To date, the District has not lived up to this promise, providing just $600,000 in recurring funding and $300,000 in non-recurring funding since the law passed in 2018. And although the proposed budget sustains home visiting programs administered through the Department of Health, it fails to renew $310,000 for the Child and Family Services Agency’s home visiting programs. These programs serve specialized populations, including fathers, parents who are returning citizens, and families facing circumstances that increase their risk for child abuse and neglect.

While the Mayor’s proposal supports advocates’ ask to sustain flat funding for Birth-to-Three law programs Help Me Grow and the Lactation Certification Preparatory programs, its failure to fully fund Healthy Futures, home visiting, and Healthy Steps limits the supports available to one-third of the District’s infants and toddlers living in households with low incomes that have experienced more pandemic-related stresses than most DC families.

Rather than making long-term, local investments in equal and fair compensation, the Mayor allocates $18.5 million across FY 2023 and 2024 to pilot and examine the effects of bonuses for programs that pay infant-toddler educators wages commensurate with education credentials. Retention isn’t something that the city needs to test: higher pay attracts a more skilled workforce, reduces turnover, and connects to better child outcomes, research shows. Educators cannot wait another year for fair pay.

**********************************************

El Grave Error de la Aldaldesa: Excluir Fondos Asignados para Desarollar un Sistema de Cuidado Infantil de Alta Calidad 

La Falta de Fondos Asignados para el Desarrollo de un Sistema de Cuidado Infantil de Alta Calidad Es un Grave Error en el Presupuesto de la Alcaldesa.

La alcaldesa Bowser dejó pasar una oportunidad sin precedentes de combinar fondos federales y locales para hacer inversiones sólidas y transformadoras que fortalecerían el sistema para la primera infancia del Distrito y garantizarían una recuperación justa para todos los niños, las familias y los programas de aprendizaje temprano. El presupuesto para los años fiscales 2022 a 2025 asignado a la educación temprana no alcanza para tomar medidas transformadoras orientadas a la construcción de un sistema para la primera infancia que sea de alta calidad, equitativo y sostenible tal como se lo concibió en la ley Birth-to-Three for all DC, que en gran medida continúa sin financiamiento desde su aprobación en 2018. Según la propuesta de la Alcaldesa, hasta el año fiscal 2025 se utilizarán cerca de $147 millones del Plan de Rescate Americano (ARP) y otros fondos federales para hacer inversiones a corto plazo esparcidas en una serie de programas (Tabla 1).

El Concejo de D. C. debe cumplir con su promesa de garantizar que la equidad comience desde el nacimiento haciendo inversiones locales a largo plazo en el sector del cuidado infantil y en la ley Birth-to-Three, con el objetivo de apoyar a los niños, a los maestros de educación temprana y a la economía del Distrito.

El Presupuesto Propuesto Estabiliza los Programas de Cuidado Infantil, pero Carece de Visión Estratégica.

El presupuesto propuesto por la Alcaldesa asigna fondos federales para estabilizar el sector del cuidado infantil, que ha sido fuertemente afectado por la pandemia. Las subvenciones destinadas a la estabilización cubrirían los costos operativos y relacionados con la salud —debido a la pandemia— de 425 programas de cuidado infantil, lo que asciende a un total de $16 millones en el presupuesto propuesto revisado para el año fiscal 2021 y de $40 millones para el año fiscal 2022, sin financiamiento a partir de entonces. Los programas de aprendizaje temprano han enfrentado profundas dificultades económicas durante toda la pandemia, a medida que aumentaban los costos comerciales y disminuían los ingresos debido a la crisis sanitaria. Es crucial que las subvenciones destinadas a la estabilización se administren rápidamente para que estos pequeños negocios puedan volver a ponerse en pie.

Si bien en su propuesta la Alcaldesa asigna $10 millones de fondos del ARP a los años fiscales 2022 y 2023 para solventar los índices de reembolso de subsidios más elevados para los proveedores de cuidado infantil, las inversiones son no recurrentes y no satisfacen por completo la solicitud realizada por la coalición Under 3 DC de fondos recurrentes por $60 millones para que los proveedores y los maestros puedan percibir ingresos más justos. Los fondos federales pueden traer el alivio a corto plazo que tanto se necesita, pero no garantizarán el pago de sueldos justos y dignos a la gran cantidad de maestros de educación temprana en su mayoría, mujeres afroamericanas y de color que perciben ingresos inferiores a los de sus pares que se desempeñan en la educación pública. Los maestros de educación temprana reciben 67 centavos por cada dólar que ganan los docentes en las escuelas públicas.

En lugar de hacer inversiones locales a largo plazo para lograr una compensación igual y justa, la Alcaldesa asigna $18.5 millones a los años fiscales 2023 y 2024 para poner a prueba y examinar los efectos de las bonificaciones para los programas que pagan los sueldos de los maestros de bebés y niños pequeños conforme a sus credenciales académicas. La ciudad no necesita probar nada con respecto la retención de los empleados: las investigaciones demuestran que los sueldos más altos atraen a una fuerza laboral más especializada, reducen la rotación del personal y se los puede vincular con la obtención de mejores resultados en la niñez. Los maestros no pueden esperar un año más para recibir un salario justo.

El Presupuesto Propuesto Dispersa Excesivamente los Fondos del ARP, lo cual Limita su Impacto.

El presupuesto de la Alcaldesa esparce los fondos federales en varias otras inversiones a corto plazo, lo que incluye:

  • $6 millones para los años fiscales 2022 y 2023 para poner a prueba un programa que incentivaría a los maestros de centros de cuidado infantil con bonificaciones de hasta $1,500 si permanecen en la profesión por 12 meses u obtienen una credencial académica.
  • $4.4 millones para los años fiscales 2022 y 2023 para dar financiamiento destinado a becas universitarias a 2,000 maestros de educación temprana que deseen obtener el título de Asociado en Desarrollo Infantil (CDA), un título técnico o una licenciatura.
  • $32 millones para las subvenciones Back2Work asignadas a 90 programas de cuidado infantil que cerraron en el transcurso de la pandemia con el objetivo de que abran más vacantes de manera preventiva y estén mejor preparados para satisfacer la demanda que habrá cuando las personas regresen al trabajo.
  • $10 millones para una nueva serie de subvenciones de expansión de acceso a cuidado infantil de calidad (A2Q) centradas en aumentar la oferta de cuidado infantil de calidad y alta calidad en las áreas en las que es escasa.

En el Distrito, la oferta de vacantes de proveedores de educación temprana ya era insuficiente antes de la pandemia y, si bien estos fondos son cruciales para la recuperación, se trata de inversiones no recurrentes que, sin una inversión local permanente, no garantizan una ayuda y una expansión del cuidado infantil sostenibles.

El Presupuesto Propuesto No Satisface las Solicitudes Relativas a los Programas de Salud Planteadas por Quienes Abogan por el Cuidado Infantil.

El presupuesto propuesto no satisface la solicitud realizada por la coalición Under 3 DC de $675,000 en fondos recurrentes destinados a ampliar Healthy Futures, un programa de consultas de salud mental que desarrolla la capacidad del personal de cuidado infantil y las familias para responder a conductas problemáticas y a las necesidades de salud mental en niños de 0 a 3 años. El presupuesto añade solo $480,000 para esta inversión necesaria. Las mejoras en Healthy Futures garantizarían que una mayor cantidad de programas de desarrollo infantil de los que participan del programa de subsidios para cuidado infantil en el Distrito estuvieran preparados para brindar, una vez que se reanude la atención presencial, los servicios de apoyo para la salud mental y conductual que son tan necesarios en sus comunidades.

Una de las mejoras de la ley Birth-to-Three que está absolutamente ausente del presupuesto de la Alcaldesa es el financiamiento de HealthySteps. Este programa incorpora un profesional de la salud con licencia en desarrollo infantil a los centros de atención primaria pediátrica para ayudar a los padres a adaptarse a la vida con un nuevo bebé y conectarlos con recursos dirigidos a familias con bebés o niños pequeños para ayudarlas a prosperar. La ley Birth-to-Three for all DC pide $300,000 en inversiones locales recurrentes adicionales para HealthySteps con el objetivo de agregar un centro de atención primaria pediátrica más por año en los distritos electorales 5, 7 u 8. Hasta la fecha, el Distrito no ha cumplido esta promesa, y ha entregado solo $600,000 en fondos recurrentes y $300,000 en fondos no recurrentes desde que se aprobó la ley en 2018. Y, si bien el presupuesto propuesto sostiene los programas de visitas al hogar administrados por medio del Departamento de Salud, no renueva $310,000 para los programas de visitas al hogar de la Agencia de Servicios a Niños y Familias. Estos programas atienden a poblaciones específicas, como papás, ciudadanos reinsertados que tienen hijos y familias que enfrentan circunstancias que conllevan un mayor riesgo de abuso y negligencia infantil.

Si bien la propuesta de la Alcaldesa apoya la solicitud realizada por quienes abogan por el cuidado infantil de mantener el financiamiento fijo para el programa Help Me Grow y el Programa Preparatorio para la Certificación en Lactancia de la ley Birth-to-Three, al no asignar el financiamiento total a Healthy Futures, a los programas de visitas al hogar y a HealthySteps, se ve limitado el apoyo disponible para un tercio de los bebés y niños pequeños del Distrito que viven en hogares de bajos recursos que han sufrido más tensiones por la pandemia que la mayoría de las familias.

Tabla 1: El Presupuesto para Educación Temprana de la Alcaldesa Bowser Carece de un Cambio Transformador y Dispersa Excesivamente los Fondos de Recuperación en Diversos Programas

Propuesta de Financiamiento por Año Fiscal y Fuente de Financiamiento

Meta de las Políticas FY21 Revisado FY22 Propuesto FY23 Propuesto FY24 Propuesto FY25 Propuesto Cantidad Aproximada de Beneficiarios Fuente de Financiamiento
Estabilización:
Financiar las subvenciones destinadas a la estabilización del sector del cuidado infantil para que los proveedores de cuidado infantil cubran los costos operativos y relacionados con la salud  $16 millones $39.8 millones $0 $0 $0 425 Centros de Cuidado Infantil Fondo de Cuidado y Desarrollo Infantil
Mejoramiento de los Índices de los Subsidios y Prueba Piloto:
Definir índices de pago de subsidios para FY22 y FY23 que cubran los costos durante la recuperación y atraigan a más proveedores para que participen en el programa de subsidios $0 $10 millones $10 millones $0 $0 270 Centros de Cuidado Infantil Fondo de Cuidado y Desarrollo Infantil
Prueba Piloto de Pagos de Calidad: Utilizar el sistema de pago de subsidios de QRIS para poner a prueba y examinar los efectos del pago de bonificaciones a los centros que pagan los sueldos de los maestros de bebés y niños pequeños conforme a sus credenciales académicas $0 $0 $9.1 millones $9.4 millones $0 200
Maestros de Centros de Cuidado Infantil
Plan de Rescate Americano
Ayuda para la Obtención de Credenciales:
Programa piloto de incentivos (bonificaciones) de retención para los maestros de educación temprana que permanezcan en la profesión por más de 12 meses u obtengan una credencial académica
$0 $3 

millones

$3 

millones

$0 $0 2,000
Maestros de Centros de Cuidado Infantil
Plan de Rescate Americano y Fondo de Cuidado y Desarrollo Infantil
Dar financiamiento para becas universitarias a maestros de educación temprana que deseen obtener el CDA, un título técnico o una licenciatura
$0 $2.2 millones $2.2 millones $0 $0 2,000
Maestros de Centros de Cuidado Infantil
Plan de Rescate Americano y Fondo de Cuidado y Desarrollo Infantil
Ampliar las Vacantes, Independientemente de la Participación en los Subsidios:
Pagar a los proveedores para que abran más vacantes de manera preventiva y estén preparados para cuando las personas regresen al trabajo y necesiten sus servicios
$0 $7.9 millones $15.8 millones $8.3 millones $0 90
Centros de Cuidado Infantil
Plan de Rescate Americano
Proveer una nueva serie de subvenciones de expansión de acceso a cuidado infantil de calidad centradas en aumentar la oferta de calidad y alta calidad para bebés y niños pequeños en las áreas en las que es escasa
$0 $5

 millones

$5 millones $0 $0 Se desconoce Plan de Rescate Americano
Total $16 millones $67.9 millones $45.1 millones $17.7 millones $0 / /
Nota: Hay aproximadamente $12,8 millones en FY24 y $13 millones en FY25 disponibles para el Fondo para el Desarrollo de la Primera Infancia del Fondo de Apuestas Deportivas que la propuesta de la Alcaldesa deja sin asignar.

Fuente: Análisis de datos realizado por DCFPI sobre el presupuesto propuesto entregado por la Oficina de Presupuestos de la Alcaldesa.

Under 3 DC

Under 3 DC, a broad based coalition in the District of Columbia, harnesses the voices and power of parents with young children, early educators, advocates, and health professionals to create transformative social change. The Coalition’s efforts center on the people experiencing racial and economic injustice every day. It shines a spotlight on the need for more public investments to support families with infants and toddlers. Together, we can set the city on a path to creating and sustaining a high quality, equitable early childhood system.

Stay Connected

Add your name to the list of community leaders receiving updates on the Under 3 DC campaign.





    https://under3dc.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/u3dc-logo-rgb-footer.png

    Under 3 DC ℅ DC Action
    1400 16th Street NW, Suite 740 | Washington, DC 20036

    For more information or to join the Under 3 DC coalition, contact Vanessa Petion. Media, please contact Tawana Jacobs.

    ©2020-2021 Under 3 DC. All rights reserved. Site designed by unkanny! Design and MW Plus.